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Monday, June 11, 2012

More Tiffany Background

Many of you have emailed about the Irises window that appeared in a previous post. Thank you for the interest in my favorite subject. I thought I would add a few more details about the original work by Tiffany Studios and even "dare to compare" --so that you just might see some new possibilities for Gallery Glass in your future.
The panel that I copied was part of the landscape window that was commissioned by Richard B. Mellon for the stairway landing of his house at 6500 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, 1908-1912. Six of the ten panels (shown in the black and white illustration) were destroyed when the house was torn down in 1940. The surviving four panels are in the Carnegie Institute.


Now, just for fun, I want to put them side by side, so you can see how closely Gallery Glass paint can look like real stained glass. It isn't too bad--considering I can do this panel (24"x36") in a couple of days (leading AND painting) when it would take months to do it in real stained glass--even if you could source ALL the colors of glass that have been used. I challenge you to push yourself to learn more about stained glass shading and possibilities with Gallery Glass, as I have. Find a Tiffany project on the internet and try it.

6 comments:

  1. WOW! WOW! Those are beautiful. Makes me want to find a window or door to paint them on.

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  2. Hey Miss Carol..I recognize that GG Tiffany painting..isn't that from the QVC Tiffany kit from YEARS ago? I still have that kit...I painted the Tiffany peacock.....did all of my painting around 1-2-3 o'clock in the morning for a couple of months....I"m much too much of a perfectionist when I paint....I will work on a single mistake I see for hours even if nobody else can see it....because I CAN SEE IT LOL

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  3. You're right, Bradford. I have a new mission: to publish as many old books as I can in this blog--so there will be a permanent record of the projects and techniques. I'm starting today with an old Redi-Lead book--watch for it. You will recognize all the books since you have the most complete library of Gallery Glass books that exists! Thanks for hanging with us! Stay tuned.

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  4. When you create these big projects, how do you resize the design? Do you try to mimic it by hand or how do you print it large enough? Thanks!

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  5. I am lucky because I have a large copier behind my desk. It enlarges to 400% at each step, so it doesn't take long to get the essential part of a pattern sized. But once I've got that done, then I go to work on it--trimming, adding borders and making it symetrical. However, when I was a crafter without a copy machine, I used an opaque projector, a device which displays patterns by shining a bright lamp onto a drawing from above. It then projects it onto a wall and by moving the device forward or back, you can enlarge the image up to 10 times it's size. I had 2--a small craft model that was okay until I bought a larger professional model which was invaluable to me when I was doing custom work. The enlarged projected image can be drawn onto the back of wrapping paper to capture any size pattern you need. I highly recommend one for professional glass crafters. They are time saving because it doesn't take multiple steps to get a design sized--you can do it with only one step. You can find many opaque projectors on the Internet by searching the topic. And for your information--I can't draw ANYTHING!

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  6. Hi Amanda and Miss Carol.....the following website is what I use to enlarge any pattern to any size you may need....you can try it out for free to see if you will like it...I really have used it alot.

    http://rapidresizer.com/

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